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To boost the research in Alzheimer’s disease, Bill Gatesinvested 50 million dollars to Dementia Discovery Fund in the search for thecure in the underlying causes of Dementia as number of people is affectedglobally.Last December 2017, World Health Organization (WHO) announcedthat the use of the substance can benefit humans without the risk of addiction andit could treat Alzheimer’s disease, Crohn’s disease, certain forms of cancer,Parkinson’s disease and other serious conditions. However, According to thePhilippines’ drug laws or Republic Act No.9165 — mostly adapted from the 1961Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, as amended by the 1972 Protocol of theUnited Nations — has formalized that marijuana is a “dangerous drug.”Another study suggest sleep disorder may increase risk ofdeveloping Alzheimer’s disease, In ‘Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity AffectsAmyloid Burden in Cognitively Normal Elderly: A Longitudinal Study’ reportsthat sleep apnoea, a sleep disorder, in which breathing repeatedly stops andstarts such cases are snoring loudly and feeling tired even after a fullnight’s sleep increases the presence of a toxic protein linked to Alzheimer’sdisease, called amyloid, in the brain. The researchers also found that sleepapnoea appears to affect amyloid not just in the short term, but over a longperiod of time.

According to Dr James Pickett, Head of Research and Developmentat Alzheimer’s Society, said that they need to dig deeper in finding out if anyof this could reduce the risk of developing dementia by participating trials oftreatments for sleep apnoea.Another research conducted by Kaiser Permanente NorthernCalifornia health care system suggest middle-aged woman who developed highblood pressure could increase the  riskof dementia later in life than women who had stable, normal blood pressurethroughout these years. However, Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research atAlzheimer’s Society, mentioned that there have been advances in how bloodpressure is treated – so it’s not clear how relevant the findings of this studyare to the present UK population because the study was only referring to theblood pressure of people in Northern California in the 1960s and 70s.   A study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences stated that an experimental blood test can identify accurately anddiagnose Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Using thistest, Alzheimer’s patients can be identified with up to 86% sensitivity and specificity.

(Sensitivity refers true positives and on otherhand, specificity refers to truenegatives which can be identified in the test.) According to the website forthe Alzheimer’s Society, a registered UK charity that funds research, doctorsdiagnose the disease based only on a careful evaluation through a postmortemexamination of a patient’s brain.  On theotherhand, Francis Martin, a professor in the School of Pharmacy and BiomedicalSciences at the University of Central Lancashire in the United Kingdom saidthat the new test’s “accuracy is markedly higher than other tests beingdeveloped,”which can be a life-changing diagnosis for Alzheimers disease. A new research finds that blood-thinning drugs may likely tobe associated with reduction in dementia as well as reducing the risk of strokein patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

The study was conducted as thelargest to examine the link between anticoagulant treatment and dementia in AFpatients, from Swedish registries for patients between 2006 and 2014. Researchershave monitored the effect over a period of time and found that takinganticoagulant drugs will prevent blood clots and had a 29% lower risk ofdeveloping dementia in the near future. However, the large study but cannotprove cause and effect according to  JamesPickett, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s Society. That’s why it’s important tofollow preliminary measures at the early age such as blood pressure in check,balance diet and taking a regular exercise. According toMartinez, Population Commission (PopCom) statistics have indicated that fromthe 2.9 percent of Filipinos beyond 65 years old almost a decade ago, theelderly population has increased to 4.

3 percent of total population from 2014to 2015. In a result, there would be 490,000 Filipinos over 65 who have varyingtypes of dementia. In the same report estimates the 2015 costs in thePhilippines of dementia at $599 million, broken down as follows: medical costs,$167 million; non-medical costs, $83 million; and informal care costs, $349million at the average 2015 exchange rate of $1:P45.5028, the average cost per year per Alzheimer’s patient is P90,552To boost the research in Alzheimer’s disease, Bill Gatesinvested 50 million dollars to Dementia Discovery Fund in the search for thecure in the underlying causes of Dementia as number of people is affectedglobally.

Last December 2017, World Health Organization (WHO) announcedthat the use of the substance can benefit humans without the risk of addiction andit could treat Alzheimer’s disease, Crohn’s disease, certain forms of cancer,Parkinson’s disease and other serious conditions. However, According to thePhilippines’ drug laws or Republic Act No.9165 — mostly adapted from the 1961Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, as amended by the 1972 Protocol of theUnited Nations — has formalized that marijuana is a “dangerous drug.”Another study suggest sleep disorder may increase risk ofdeveloping Alzheimer’s disease, In ‘Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity AffectsAmyloid Burden in Cognitively Normal Elderly: A Longitudinal Study’ reportsthat sleep apnoea, a sleep disorder, in which breathing repeatedly stops andstarts such cases are snoring loudly and feeling tired even after a fullnight’s sleep increases the presence of a toxic protein linked to Alzheimer’sdisease, called amyloid, in the brain. The researchers also found that sleepapnoea appears to affect amyloid not just in the short term, but over a longperiod of time. According to Dr James Pickett, Head of Research and Developmentat Alzheimer’s Society, said that they need to dig deeper in finding out if anyof this could reduce the risk of developing dementia by participating trials oftreatments for sleep apnoea.

Another research conducted by Kaiser Permanente NorthernCalifornia health care system suggest middle-aged woman who developed highblood pressure could increase the  riskof dementia later in life than women who had stable, normal blood pressurethroughout these years. However, Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research atAlzheimer’s Society, mentioned that there have been advances in how bloodpressure is treated – so it’s not clear how relevant the findings of this studyare to the present UK population because the study was only referring to theblood pressure of people in Northern California in the 1960s and 70s.   A study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences stated that an experimental blood test can identify accurately anddiagnose Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Using thistest, Alzheimer’s patients can be identified with up to 86% sensitivity and specificity.

(Sensitivity refers true positives and on otherhand, specificity refers to truenegatives which can be identified in the test.) According to the website forthe Alzheimer’s Society, a registered UK charity that funds research, doctorsdiagnose the disease based only on a careful evaluation through a postmortemexamination of a patient’s brain.  On theotherhand, Francis Martin, a professor in the School of Pharmacy and BiomedicalSciences at the University of Central Lancashire in the United Kingdom saidthat the new test’s “accuracy is markedly higher than other tests beingdeveloped,”which can be a life-changing diagnosis for Alzheimers disease. A new research finds that blood-thinning drugs may likely tobe associated with reduction in dementia as well as reducing the risk of strokein patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The study was conducted as thelargest to examine the link between anticoagulant treatment and dementia in AFpatients, from Swedish registries for patients between 2006 and 2014. Researchershave monitored the effect over a period of time and found that takinganticoagulant drugs will prevent blood clots and had a 29% lower risk ofdeveloping dementia in the near future.

However, the large study but cannotprove cause and effect according to  JamesPickett, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s Society. That’s why it’s important tofollow preliminary measures at the early age such as blood pressure in check,balance diet and taking a regular exercise. According toMartinez, Population Commission (PopCom) statistics have indicated that fromthe 2.

9 percent of Filipinos beyond 65 years old almost a decade ago, theelderly population has increased to 4.3 percent of total population from 2014to 2015. In a result, there would be 490,000 Filipinos over 65 who have varyingtypes of dementia.

In the same report estimates the 2015 costs in thePhilippines of dementia at $599 million, broken down as follows: medical costs,$167 million; non-medical costs, $83 million; and informal care costs, $349million at the average 2015 exchange rate of $1:P45.5028, the average cost per year per Alzheimer’s patient is P90,552