Criminal Acts Essay

Criminal Acts and Choices University of Phoenix Abstract This paper will identify and describe choice theories and also how they relate to crime. This paper will list and describe the common models used by society to determine which acts are considered to be criminal, how they are affected by choice theories, and how they are enforced by the government. Both of the models may be different but they both tell us something about the system that out agencies use today. Criminal theories can be very frustrating but captivating at the same time. Everyone has a different outlook on why people commit crimes.

Many offenders commit crimes because the rewards weight out the penalties in the act of crime they are committing. Choice theories related to a criminal behavior have been created to determine a reason why a crime has been committed. What is choice theory? “Choice theory states we are motivated by a never ending quest to satisfy the following five basic needs woven into our genes: to love and belong, to be powerful, to be free, to have fun and to survive” (Sullo, 2010, para. 1). Choice theory relates to criminal behavior because it tells us how crime was created.

This theory explains that a criminal’s motivation to do a crime is on purpose. Choice theory states that we are internally motivated because you choose your own behavior. There are two common models used by society to determine certain criminal acts. For starters, “consensus model assumes that each of the component parts of the criminal justice system strives toward a common goal and that the movement of cases and people through the system is smooth due to cooperation between the various components of the system” (Schmalleger, 2009).

This model sometimes can imply a greater level of organization among different agencies of justice than what really exits. Consensus model relates to choice theory by the five basic needs. This model defines criminal behavior of society as a whole, while choice theories tell us that we are internally motivated and not externally by rewards and punishment. On the other hand, conflict models “argue that the organizations of a criminal justice system either do, or, should, work competitively to produce justice as opposed to cooperatively” (“Conflict model,” 2013).

With the conflict model you can gain more from competing with another society than working with them. According to Schmalleger (2009), the goals of individual agencies often battle, and pressures for success, advancement, pay raise, and general accountability fragment the efforts of the system as a whole, leading to a criminal justice non-system. The conflict model causes many issues between different groups and individuals when it comes to legal issues. With the conflict model, the police cannot take certain actions without consulting with a judge first.

Both models do contribute to society. Both models each have something to tell us about the justice system that we can count on in many ways. Consensus model believes that values can be in society worldwide and in diverse groups. Consensus model serves the whole society. As for conflict model, it values are different among each group in the society. Conflict model is organized by the leading class to maintain economic and political control. Overall the consensus model and conflict model relates to choice theory in their own way.

Choice theory states that individuals on a daily choose a certain way to behave which includes criminal behavior. References Conflict model. (2013). In Conflict model (criminal justice) . Retrieved from http://encyclopedia. thefreedictionary. com/Conflict+model+(criminal+justice Schmalleger, F. (2009). Criminal Justice Today. An Introductory Text for the 21st Century (10th ed. ). : Prentice Hall.. Sullo, B. (2010, Summer). Choice theory . Educaors, (), . Retrieved from http://www. funderstanding. com/educators/choice-theory/