Impacts of the Environment on the Nutrition of People across the Globe Essay

Abstract

With increased industrialization in almost every part of the world, there is that negative impacts that this has on the environment which is massive and very dangerous. The industrial wastes released from the companies contaminate lands as well as water bodies. The chemical spills and poisonous fumes have been reported to have altered the chemistry of the atmospheric air leading to depletion of the ozone layer; this has in turn caused a lot of overheating over the earth’s surface due to greenhouse effect. Other human activities like excessive logging have resulted into destruction of forests which are water catchment areas, hence changing the entire climatic condition. With an altered climate and destruction of habitat, most animals are therefore left with no choice but to face extinction. It is from these polluted lands, water and the endangered species of living things that human draw their food; therefore any attempt to worsen the environment greatly affects the nutrition of people globally.

Introduction

Melinda Smith, (Environment, Nutrition and Poverty:  Impact Childhood Mortality: 2007) states the World Health Organization’s (WHO), on the children mortality, reported that because of  poor sanitation, un-safe drinking water and un-balanced diet, ten million children under the age of  five die annually. A large percentage of these deaths can be prevented if only the people are living in an environment which is relatively less polluted. Not only children alone are faced with this problem but everyone. It has become a global problem.  That is the reason why something has to be done, to bring down this menace under control, and at least reduce the mortality rate. If we do not take care of our environment is like signing our death warrant, because the environment will fight back through the foods we eat, water we drink and in the air we breathe.

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Impacts of the Environment on the Nutrition of People across the Globe

The world population is rapidly increasing and there is pressure to boost food production to match the demand. Therefore many people have resorted to clearing forests to create room for cattle raring and some to grow food crops to increase beef production and food crop supply. But on the other hand very little or just no regeneration of the forest is taking place. But since it is the forests that are responsible for the transfer of carbon between the soil, vegetation and the atmosphere, it’s reduction will have a grave and devastating effect on the people’s nutrition, since there will be shortage in oxygen which is essential for the survival of any life.

Industrial effluents released into the water bodies, for instance oil spills, are a threat to marine life, which are also used as food. The heavy metal wastes that find their way into the water bodies can be consumed by the marine animals where they will finally find their way into our bodies. Researchers have pointed out that the poor fishing habits of man coupled with the idea to mine in the ocean are reducing natural marine animals to nothingness (P. Yen, 255-256).

Conclusion

Reports on the degradation of the environment are troubling. Researchers have therefore found out that by resorting to a vegetarian type of life, a lot more will be saved in the environment.  What we are witnessing now is just a tip of the ice burg to that which the future holds in terms of public health. It can accurately be predicted that if the practices that are polluting the environment continue un-watched then the future generation will inherit a completely polluted soil, water bodies and an atmosphere full of poisonous gases.  Measures should therefore be put in place to protect the environment and consequently our health.

Reference

Melinda Smith: “Environment, Nutrition and Poverty:  Impact Childhood Mortality”:

P. Yen: “Impact of the eating environment”: Geriatric Nursing, Volume 24, Issue 4, Pages 255  256 Washington: 24 October 2007.