James students who they think are breaking

James Hirby of Tulane University describes Probable Cause, as when a member of authority requires actual evidence to start an investigation. The debate of this implementation over reasonable suspicion, meaning only “requiring a hunch,” in public high schools has been argued about everywhere (Hirby). Probable cause ought to apply to public high schools. If probable cause is not put into place, students can become discouraged to attend schools. Especially, if the school’s initial attendance rate is mediocre. Students are “pushed out” of unfavorable school environments, which can lead to numerous drop-outs (Doll). Reasonable suspicion gives teachers and principals the right to target at-risk students who they think are breaking rules, creating a hostile atmosphere, thus “pushing” out students. Yes, schools can rely in their already-put-in-place attendance system such as court, fines, etc. However, 11 states only require students to be 16-years-old to authorize their own withdrawal, 16 states; 17-years-old, and 23 states; 18-years-old (NCSL). If students stop attending, schools will lose money because usually attendance is a source of funds. A Los Angeles school district lost $45 Million through absences last year (Favot). Public schools, which rely on government funding, will lose their money because of absent students that don’t go due to the environment they learn in. It’s possible that outside donors can resolve this issue, but studies show that donations to public schools have decreased and donations to private schools have increased (Bronner). Without probable cause put into place it ultimately fails students. Specifically of that generation. A Pennsylvania school is an example of what happens when a school loses funding: the student’s scores decrease (Lewis). If there is no progress, there is no education for these children to attain, therefore failing them academically. It can be argued that private or charter schools can be available to students with vouchers. Valerie Strauss explains how a charter school placed information about a teen’s drug arrest on their ad for their upcoming semester and asked, “Why worry about this type of student at school? Come visit Arts Academy Charter School. Now enrolling grades 6-12.” It puts at-risk youth aside in academic denial. Instituting probable cause can prevent the failure of education in the US and save it’s students from a life lacking academics.