Job Description Essay

When you’re asked what your greatest weakness is, try to turn a negative into a positive. For example, a sense of urgency to get projects completed or wanting to triple-check every item in a spreadsheet can be turned into a strength i. e. you are a candidate who will make sure that the project is done on time and your work will be close to perfect. Note that the term “weakness” isn’t used in the sample answers – you always want to focus on the positive when interviewing. When I’m working on a project, I don’t want just to meet deadlines.

Rather, I prefer to complete the project well ahead of schedule. Being organized wasn’t my strongest point, but I implemented a time management system that really helped my organization skills. I like to make sure that my work is perfect, so I tend to perhaps spend a little too much time checking it. However, I’ve come to a good balance by setting up a system to ensure everything is done correctly the first time. I used to wait until the last minute to set appointments for the coming week, but I realized that scheduling in advance makes much more sense.This is one of the easier interview questions you’ll be asked. When you are asked questions about your strengths, it’s important to discuss attributes that will qualify you for the job. The best way to respond is to describe the skills and experience that directly correlate with the job you are applying for.

When I’m working on a project, I don’t want just to meet deadlines. Rather, I prefer to complete the project well ahead of schedule. I have exceeded my sales goals every quarter and I’ve earned a bonus each year since I started with my current employer.My time management skills are excellent and I’m organized, efficient, and take pride in excelling at my work. I pride myself on my customer service skills and my ability to resolve what could be difficult situations. You walk into the interview room, shake hands with your interviewer and sit down with your best interviewing smile on. Guess what their first question is? “Tell me about yourself.

” Do you “wing it” and actually tell all manner of things about yourself? Will you spend the next 5 minutes rambling on about what an easy-going, loyal, dedicated, hard working employee you’ve been?If this is the case, you stand a good chance of having bored your interviewer to death thus creating a negative first impression. Because it’s such a common interview question, it’s strange that more candidates don’t spend the time to prepare for exactly how to answer it. Perhaps because the question seems so disarming and informal, we drop our guard and shift into ramble mode. Resist all temptation to do so. Your interviewer is not looking for a 10-minute dissertation here.

Instead, offer a razor sharp sentence or two that sets the stage for further discussion and sets you apart from your competitors.Give them “your synopsis about you” answer, specifically your Unique Selling Proposition. Known as a personal branding or a value-added statement, the USP is a succinct, one-sentence description of who you are, your biggest strength and the major benefit that a company will derive from this strength.

Here is an example of a Unique Selling Proposition: “I’m a seasoned Retail Manager strong in developing training programs and loss prevention techniques that have resulted in revenue savings of over $2. Million for (employer’s name) during the past 11 years. ” What a difference you’ve made with this statement.

Your interviewer is now sitting forward in her chair giving you her full attention. At this point, you might add the following sentence: “I’d like to discuss how I might be able to do something like that for you. ” The ball is now back in her court and you have the beginnings of a real discussion and not an interrogation process. The key is that you must lead with your strongest benefit to the employer.Be specific and don’t wander about with some laundry list of skills or talents.

Be sure to put a monetary value on your work if at all possible and be ready with details when you’re called upon. Give an estimated value to the $$ you’ve either helped to make or save for your employer. When you walk into an interview, remember to always expect the “tell me about yourself” question. Prepare ahead of time by developing your own personal branding statement that clearly tells who you are, your major strength and the clear benefit that your employer received.The advantages of this approach are that you’ll quickly gain their attention and interest them in knowing more.

You’ll separate yourself from your competitors. You’ll also have a higher chance of being positively remembered and hired. Job Interview Questions About Your Career Goals and Sample Answers The overall theme for each of the answers below is: have you thought about the impact of your decisions at the time you made them – or do you have a reactive response to most situations.

Far too often, a person’s career appears to have happened by chance.In todays fast-paced, ever changing world of work, employer’s want to know if they can count on you to make good decisions, not knee-jerk reactions. Also, explain the thinking process that went into make each of those decisions. For my first job, I was happy to know I would be working in a job that utilized my education.

It was exciting to know that within just a few weeks of graduation, I had my first paycheck. My thinking behind the XYZ position centered on the fact that they have a global presence, it was a definite promotion and positioned me to be a viable candidate for the marketing position with your company.If you stayed with your current company, what would be your next move? The upward mobility at my current company would most likely be in the global marketing department. Describe your dream job. As a child, I dreamed of being the starting pitcher for the Chicago Cubs. When I realized I did not have a fast ball, or a change -up; I concentrated on my skills in marketing because I realized it is an area where I not only can make significant contributions, but I enjoy using my talent in a corporate environment.