Ocr Unit 22 Level 3 Teaching Assistant Essay

Disabled children and young people with special educational needs are entitled to access to children’s services, an education, health services, housing and Equality and non-discrimination entitlement. (The Disability Discrimination Act DDA) These arise when one or more public body has a relevant duty – whether this duty is owed to all disabled children or only to some, for example those with a certain level of need or those in a certain age group.

It is vitally important ant that recognition of these needs are met early because those children who may show early signs of learning disabilities it is essential for children to obtain the support they need to be successful school. Identifying the symptoms early is key to ensuring the child reaches his/her potential. Early diagnosis leads to earlier support and greater opportunity to ensure the needs are met regardless of the learning disability. Much research indicates greater student success occurs with early identification and intervention.

It is so important that the children’s first experience of education is successful and enjoyable and teachers can recognize that a young child may not be learning in an expected manner, they can take steps to enhance the child’s early school success. In general terms, disabled children are entitled to have their needs assessed and a person-centred plan put in place to ensure these needs are met, if found to be sufficiently substantial by the assessment.

Local areas may seek to address needs using less formal arrangements than those prescribed by the law, for instance by applying the Common Assessment Framework (which has no statutory basis) rather than carrying out an initial or core assessment. To the extent that disabled children and families are satisfied with the outcomes of these arrangements, this may be acceptable.

However, if (as is too frequently the case) disputes emerge between families and public bodies as to the level of services and support to In general terms, disabled children are entitled to have their needs assessed and a person-centred plan put in place to ensure these needs are met, if found to be sufficiently substantial by the assessment. Local areas may seek to address needs using less formal arrangements than those prescribed by the law, for instance by pplying the Common Assessment Framework rather than carrying out an initial or core assessment. To the extent that disabled children and families are satisfied with the outcomes of these arrangements, this may be acceptable. However; frequently disputes emerge between families and public bodies as to the level of services and support given. Children’s services • An initial assessment to determine what additional needs for services and support they may have. A core assessment, if they may need support from a number of different Agencies. • A care plan following an assessment, which should be a ‘realistic plan of action (including services to be provided). • Services to meet their assessed needs, where intervention is required to secure their well-being. • Suitable accommodation, if their parent or parents are prevented (for whatever reason) from providing them with suitable accommodation or care. • A personal adviser and pathway plan after the age of 16 if they are ‘leaving care’.

Education • A statutory assessment in relation to their special educational needs (SEN), if it may be necessary for their special educational provision to be determined by the local education authority. • A Statement of SEN, where their statutory assessment shows that it is necessary for their special educational provision to be determined by the LEA. • All the special educational provision quantified and specified in their statement. • A transition plan following the annual review of their statement at age 14. A learning difficulty assessment in their last year of school. • Not be excluded from school, other than as a ‘last resort’. • Suitable education otherwise than in school if they are out of school for whatever reason, regardless of any resource constraints . Health • An assessment of their healthcare needs. • Services to meet their assessed healthcare needs. • NHS continuing care, if their health needs are complex. • Age-appropriate child and adolescent mental health services, if they have mental health needs. Palliative care, if they have a life-limiting condition. Housing •A Disabled Facilities Grant to adapt their home, if such a grant is necessary to facilitate access or make the home safe. Benefits • A wide range of financial benefits, in particular Disability Living Allowance, if the relevant eligibility criteria are met. Equality and non-discrimination • Access to almost every aspect of public life without discrimination, whether direct, indirect or for a reason relating to their disability. Reasonable adjustments to help support their access on an equal footing to their non-disabled peers. The parents, family and friends caring for disabled children are entitled to … • Be free from discrimination arising ‘by association’ with the disabled child. • A carer’s assessment to help them sustain their caring role and to remain in (or return to) work and to participate in education, training and leisure activities. • Services to meet their needs as carers if the assessment shows a critical or substantial risk in a relevant area of their life. Have their caring role taken away, if they are a young carer or if they are an adult carer who no longer feels able to continue caring. Individual Learning Plans Children with behavioural and learning difficulties should have individual learning plans; these are an effective tool to help the learner become confident, motivated and successful in education. The ILP is a personalised working document for teachers and the pupil, the heart of the document is based on assessment of the child’s ability and the ways forward to help the pupil achieve their own potential.

Achievable Learning targets with outcomes and timescales and how this will be achieved (success criteria) will be included along with details of the resources, support and guidance the learner will need. The pupil will gain confidence through success and should be able to apply the skills learnt in a range of different contexts such as the home and in social settings. The ILP is also a personal passport if the child moves school as it’s a record of their goals and progression, which should if used correctly make the transition process a lot smoother and less stressful for the child.

The benefits of working inclusively with disabled children and young people with special educational needs: 1. Friendships 2. Increased social initiations, relationships and networks 3. Peer role models for academic, social and behaviour skills 4. Increased achievement of  IEP goals 5. Greater access to general curriculum 6. Enhanced skill acquisition and generalization 7. Increased inclusion in future environments 8. Greater opportunities for interactions 9. Higher expectations 10. Increased school staff collaboration 11. Increased parent participation 2. Families are more integrated into community The relationship between disability and special educational needs; Disability is a broad term that compares actual ability to normal functioning. It is most often used to refer to impairment, be it physical (paralysis), sensory (blindness), cognitive (dementia), intellectual (mental retardation) or mental health (bipolar disorder). A person may be considered disabled if he or she has a condition that affects the ability to function without assistance at a level needed to maintain well-being.

The term ‘special educational needs’ (SEN) has a legal definition, referring to children who have learning difficulties or disabilities that make it harder for them to learn or access education than most children of the same age. Educational & Emotional needs of pupils in the Whitehouse. The children who are referred or are on permanent placements at the Whitehouse have moderate to severe behavioural difficulties. These children often have complex needs, which they displayed in the unwanted behaviour at their mainstream school; which in turn has led to them been referred to our service.

Once referred; we work closely with the child and parents/carer offering a wide verity of help and access to external agencies. We focus firstly on behaviour management attempting to get the child to take ownership of their own unwanted behaviour. From there we take the success into their homes and aim for continuity of practice. After initial assessment the children have individual learning plans aimed at attainable success to build their confidence in educational settings. Often children display unwanted behaviours to cover up embarrassment due to their academic failure). Giving the child confidence in their own ability to succeed has a great effect on their overall self esteem and independence. Once the child has gained success and can verbalise problems, instead of acting through unwanted behaviour or violence we aim to reintegrate (if possible) the child slowly back into a mainstream setting. We place support not just for the child but the teacher and school alike bringing in outside agencies if needed.