Tarantino Essay

There are a variety of camera angles and types of shots that are considered typical of a Tarantino movie. He often frames characters with doorways and shows them opening and closing doors, and he often films characters from the back. He uses widely-imitated quick cuts of character’s hands performing actions in extreme closeup, a technique reminiscent of Brian De Palma. He will use a long closeup of a person’s face while someone else speaks off-screen (closeup of The Bride while Bill talks, of Butch while Marsellus talks, Ted’s face when Chester talks in Four Rooms).

Although he did not invent it, Tarantino popularized the trunk shot, which is featured in Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, and Kill Bill. In Grindhouse (Death Proof feature), Tarantino’s traditional shot looking up at the actors from the trunk of a car is replaced by one looking up from under the hood. Often he will shoot a character’s feet during a key moment (such as the depressing of a car’s pedals, as seen in Pulp Fiction). A lot of what Tarantino does involves violent content, it must be said.

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However, when one observes very carefully, one sees that Tarantino’s films make reference to violence rather than show it on camera. Violence is used as a means to tell a story and its consequences are shown – often to demonstrate the very moral that violence never solves anything but causes, ultimately, far more problems. Usually, Tarantino does not like to include the actual violence on camera in graphic detail1, and he says he strongly detests both violence and drugs. publicity contact photo gallery resume NewsDesk message board External Links official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Biography for Quentin Tarantino More at IMDb Pro » [pic][pic] advertisement Date of Birth 27 March 1963, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA Birth Name Quentin Jerome Tarantino Nickname QT Height 6′ 1″ (1. 85 m) Mini Biography In January of 1992 a film titled Reservoir Dogs (1992) hit the Sundance Film festival. The writer-director was a first-timer by the name of Quentin Tarantino. The film garnered critical acclaim and the director became a legend in the England, UK and the cult film circuit. Two years later he followed up ‘Dogs’ with the film Pulp Fiction (1994). Pulp’ premiered at the Cannes film festival, where it won the coveted ‘Palme D’Or’ the virtual equal of the Best Picture at the Academy Awards. At the 1995 Academy Awards, ‘Pulp’ was nominated for the Best Picture Oscar, also for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay, among others. Tarantino and writing partner Roger Avary came away with the award only for Best Original Screenplay. In 1995, Tarantino directed one fourth of the Anthology Four Rooms (1995) with friends and fellow auteurs Alexandre Rockwell, Robert Rodriguez, and Allison Anders.

That film was released on December 25th in the United States to very weak reviews. This is mainly due to the heavy cutting of the first two segments and the introduction which make much of the plotline unintelligible, and creates a complete mess out of the second segment, directed by Alexandre Rockwell. The best two segments of the film are Robert Rodriguez’s and Tarantino’s. Tarantino’s next film was From Dusk Till Dawn (1996), a crime/vampire film which he wrote and co-starred with George Clooney.

The film did fairly well theatrically. IMDb Mini Biography By: Kale Whorton Trade Mark His main characters drive cars from Chevrolet, such as Jules’ 1974 Nova and Vincent’s 1960s Malibu. He often frames characters with doorways and shows them opening and closing doors. Much of the violence and minor character dialogue is offscreen in his films. Briefcases and suitcases play an important role in Pulp Fiction (1994), Reservoir Dogs (1992), Jackie Brown (1997), True Romance (1993), and Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004).

Makes references to cult movies and television. Frequently works with Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Uma Thurman, and Samuel L. Jackson. His films usually have a shot from inside a car trunk. Lead characters usually drive General Motors vehicles, particularly Chevrolet and Cadillac. He always has a Dutch element in his films: The opening tune, Little Green Bag, in Reservoir Dogs (1992) was performed by George Baker and written by Jan Gerbrand Visser and Benjamino Bouwens who are all Dutch.

The character Freddy Newandyke, played by Tim Roth is a direct translation to a typical Dutch last name, Nieuwendijk. The code name of Tim Roth is Mr. Orange, the royal color of Holland, and the last name of the royal family. The Amsterdam conversation in PulpFiction, Vincent Vega smokes from a Dutch tobacco shag (Drum), the mentioning of Rutger Hauer in Jackie Brown (1997), the bride’s name is Beatrix, the name of the Royal Dutch Queen.

The Mexican Standoff: All his movies (including True Romance (1993), which he only wrote and did not direct) feature a scene in which three or more characters are pointing guns at each other at the same time. Often uses an unconventional storytelling device in his films, such as retrospect (Reservoir Dogs (1992)), non-linear (Pulp Fiction (1994)), or “chapter” format (_Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)_). His films will often include one long, unbroken take where a character is followed around somewhere. He often frames characters with doorways and shows them opening and closing doors.

Much of the violence and minor character dialogue is offscreen in his films. His films usually have a shot from inside a car trunk. The Mexican Standoff: All his movies (including True Romance (1993), which he only wrote and did not direct) feature a scene in which three or more characters are pointing guns at each other at the same time. Often uses an unconventional storytelling device in his films, such as retrospect (Reservoir Dogs (1992)), non-linear (Pulp Fiction (1994)), or “chapter” format (_Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)_).

Widely imitated quick cuts of character’s hands performing actions in extreme closeup, a technique reminiscent of Brian De Palma. Long closeup of a person’s face while someone else speaks off-screen (closeup of The Bride while Bill talks, of Butch while Marsellus talks). Aliases. He uses aliases in nearly all of his movies: Honey Bunny and Pumpkin from Pulp Fiction (1994), Mr White, Blonde, Orange etc. from Reservoir Dogs (1992). Bill’s team in Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) (Black Mamba, Copperhead, Cottonmouth, and California Mountain Snake). r