Tests and Measures in Psychology Essay

Introduction:

Tests and Measures in Psychology is a very important topic in the branch of psychology and can be very helpful in many ways. Tests and measurements are basically instruments such as inventories and questionnaires that are standardized and are used for psychological diagnoses. This course provides knowledge and skills that can help an individual to understand, select, score and administer group educational and psychological tests (Embretson & Reise, 2000). Learning this course builds one to become an effective scholar-practitioner committed to positive social changes. This article brings out the effectiveness of this course in terms of influencing one to become an effective scholar-practitioner who is able to bring positive social changes in the society.

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Tests and measurement helps one to gain knowledge in terms of test construction processes and validation. As a psychologist it is important to effectively construct tests regarding the psychological condition of the patient and clearly validate the results so as come up with a proper diagnosis of the psychological condition of the patient (Michell, 1997). This will help in providing an effective psychological treatment. This can bring a positive social change in the society because many people will be able to have their psychological disorders treated well thereby helping to promote a healthy and sound society.

Secondly, tests and measurements help to equip a practitioner with information concerning the practice and the general laws of different lands. Different lands or societies have different laws governing them which influence the kind of psychological problems and treatments that can be offered in such places. A practitioner is able to study and clearly know the laws of the specific land of practice and so become relevant in offering the services in that will benefit and heal the society thereby promoting positive social changes in that society.

Thirdly, tests and measurements equip a practitioner with knowledge regarding sexism, racism and overall cultural diversity especially when it comes to the making of assessment decisions. A practitioner is able to understand the issues of sexism, racism and the cultural diversity that affect a particular society in a proper way (Thurstone, 1929). This is significant in terms of clearly understanding the genesis of most of the psychological problems of a particular society and so be able to make proper and accurate assessment decisions. This will ideally help many people who have racism and sexism psychological problems by the practitioner being able to effectively administer psychological treatment to them.

Tests and measurements also help the practitioner to be able effectively measure the aptitude and test the IQ of patients. This is an important element in psychological testing and is a key knowledge in terms of properly diagnosing the problems of a patient. A practitioner is able to gain knowledge in terms of how to determine the IQ level of a patient and the aptitude level and so be able to know the style and technique of effectively administering treatment to a patient with psychological problems. This will eventually promote a social change since many people will be treated well thereby promoting a healthy society.

In conclusion, tests and measurement course is able to equip an individual with knowledge in many areas of psychological learning which when applied in the field is able to bring health to many people who are suffering in the society. This will therefore promote positive social changes in a particular society.

References:

Embretson, S., & Reise, S. (2000). Item Response Theory for Psychologists. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Michell, J. (1997). Quantitative science and measurement definition in psychology. British Journal of Psychology.

Thurstone, L. (1929). The Measurement of Psychological Value. In T.V. Smith and W.K. Wright (Eds.), Essays in Philosophy by Seventeen Doctors of Philosophy of the University of Chicago. Chicago: Open Court