The Changing Face of Abortion Essay

The Changing Face of Abortion

            Sources say that abortion rates have been steadily slouching since the 1980s “from a peak of 29.3 abortions per 1,000 women in 1981 to 19.4 in 2005” (Kliff 1).  However, the most dramatic changes include the demographics of abortion, wherein women who practice abortion today are usually older, such as moms who strive to take care of children that they already have, according to the study done by Guttmacher Institute.  The past 30 years, on the other hand, saw a steady drop on the rate of teenage abortion, wherein “[f]rom 1974 to 1989, women aged 18-19 had the highest abortion rate among all age groups, varying from 32 to 62 per 1,000 women” (Kliff 1).  After 15 years or by 2004, this made a huge drop to a rate of about 20.5 (Kliff 1), which is about 27% drop from the rate of teenage abortion in 1974.

The problem with proper use of contraceptives and sexual behavior landed on the more aged groups, wherein abortion rate for women ages 20 to 24 years old soared by 10 points higher from 1974 to 2004, which followed the same pattern as that of the next age group of women ages 25 to 29 years of age.  A number of reasons to this changing trend include lack of initiatives for the more aged women groups, as well as lack of health insurances that affects access to affordable contraceptives.  Financial barriers are also among the most significant reasons to this, especially that most of these women practicing abortion were from below the federal poverty line, as based on Guttmacher’s previous research study.  Since there is higher rate of abortion among women of the minority groups, it appears that the most significant factors of abortion include those that are under the finance and the economy.

Works Cited

Kliff, Sarah.  “The Changing Face of Abortion.”  23 September 2008.  Newsweek, Inc.  16 October 2008 <http://www.newsweek.com/id/160401/page/1>.