The Effects the Congress of Vienna had on Africa Essay

The congress of Vienna was held in Vienna for a period of eight months. It was a congress meant to iron out issues regarding political boundaries. It was also meant to restore international peace and restoration of old aristocracy. The congress handled many factors including the position of France. Apart from political borders it involves other issues. The evicted dynasties were addressed. The territories which had been lost by authorities in the past were also tackled. The implementation of this congress made France to regain its boundaries.  The congress of Vienna played a major part in the structure of global politics. This happened up to the 1st word war[1].

The congress also strived to eliminate the power imbalance. A country like England was worried because of the large size of Russia.  The country thought that this was a threat to peace. Many other countries e.g. Austria believed the same. This therefore made every other country had greed for power and authority. They strived be more powerful than another. The most contributing factor towards obtaining power was colonising as many countries as possible. This made them to expand their territorial boundaries. They took up African land by force. They used the land for farming and settlement. The European established the structure of governance in order to effectively serve or meet the interests. Their form of governance was meant was meant to partition Africa. This was however was not tolerated by the people in Africa. There was a lot of resistance by Africans since they feared to lose their country and resources to the strangers. This led to formation of several resistant movements in order to fight the Europeans. The outcome of the congress had various impacts on African countries[2].

African countries were important because of slave trade which flourished in 19th century. Africans worked for white man’s farms in order to earn wages. European countries were in the race to colonise African countries. These countries include France, Britain, Germany, Portugal and Spain. Their main interests were to obtain raw materials for their industries. Another factor was also to get the labour for these industries. They used several means to obtain slaves in order to get cheap labour for production. They could kidnap them or they could entice them using several enticements. Another objective of the colonialists was to make ?wealth. Therefore they overworked the slaves to increase production and hence profitability. They also took the African land by force to use it for farming. They charged tax from the people to increase their income. This greatly affected the life of the people since they live d as squatters in their own country[3].

They also got minimal wages which could rarely meet their basic needs. The working conditions in the industries were not good at all. There was a lot of air pollution because they used coal as a major source of energy. The lighting was also very poor.  This made their living conditions miserable. They were made to work under such uncomfortable conditions. Africans adopted the western way of clothing and eating. They started to eat processed food unlike the herbs they used to eat. Their religion also changed. However colonialism is still experienced up to today in Africa. The systems education and even the structures of governments were not thrown away after the countries got independence. Some of the African industries are still owned by foreign countries. The countries also receive a great amount of financial aid from abroad. This is an indicator of foreign dependence in Africa[4].

Bibliography

Abbott, Elizabeth. Sugar: a bittersweet history. Canada: Penguin, 2008.

Duiker, William J. and Spielvogel, Jackson J. World History. New York: Cengage Learning,

2008.

Powell, Jim. Greatest emancipations: how the West abolished slavery. Palgrave Macmillan,

2008.

Talbott, Srobe. The great experiment: the story of ancient empires, modern states, and the quest

for a global nation. New Jersey: Simon & Schuster, 2008.

[1] Duiker, William J. and Spielvogel, Jackson J. World History. New York: Cengage Learning, 2008.
[2] Talbott, Srobe. The great experiment: the story of ancient empires, modern states, and the quest for a global nation. New Jersey: Simon & Schuster, 2008.

[3] Powell, Jim. Greatest emancipations: how the West abolished slavery. Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
[4] Abbott, Elizabeth. Sugar: a bittersweet history. Canada: Penguin, 2008. Abbott, Elizabeth. Sugar: a bittersweet history. Canada: Penguin, 2008.