The Veracruz battle Essay

The Veracruz battle

Conceptually, the Veracruz battle is commonly referred as the siege of Veracruz by the USA. It battle took place from 9th march 1847 to 29 march 1847 at Veracruz, Mexico. In America, commanders were Winfield Scott (army), David Conner (navy), and Mathew P. Perry (navy). In Mexico, the commander was Juan Morales. The forces from America were the U.S. Expeditionary Force (army and navy paramilitaries), 10000 in number. In Mexico, the garrison men who amounted to 4390 in number were involved in guarding Veracruz.[1]

The start of this battle was very controversial. This is because when Sloat was United States navy official, the law did not allow him to attempt an attack towards California, which he did and then reprimanded by the then the Mexico’s president, James K. Polk. Sloat had ever vowed to annex California and make it part of America, an idea that natives from California received negatively and bitterly. However, the idea flopped due to lack of support from the government. After this failed to work, America decided to annex Veracruz. The army of occupation was transferred to Commander Scott, ensuring government support. Scott was also supported by Washington officials who agreed to land on Veracruz to extend Americans coverage and horizons. The siege process took twenty days and it was very successful with Americans taking the victory. The cause of this battle was attributed to contradiction between real practice and stated ideals, the unconfirmed distinction between just and unjust war, different ways in which people from various multicultural societies defined and understood citizenship and finally the hardships in the way to development and democracy. There was Connors ships used, which could cover 90 yards.[2]

Bibliography

Michael Meyer. The Oxford History of Mexico. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000, pp.68

Raphael Gregory. The Ideals of the Veracruz War. New York, Prentice Hall, pp.144

[1] Raphael Gregory. The Ideals of the Veracruz War. New York, Prentice Hall, pp.144

[2] Michael Meyer. The Oxford History of Mexico. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000, pp.68